December 16, 2010

Overactive and underactive bladder Dysfunction Is Reflected by Alterations in Urothelial ATP and NO release.

Overactive and underactive bladder Dysfunction Is Reflected by Alterations in Urothelial ATP and NO release.: "


Overactive and underactive bladder Dysfunction Is Reflected by Alterations in Urothelial ATP and NO release.

Neurochem Int. 2010 Dec 7;

Authors: Munoz A, Smith CP, Boone TB, Somogyi GT

ATP and NO are released from the urothelium in the bladder. Detrusor Overactivity (DO) following spinal cord injury results in higher ATP and lower NO release from the bladder urothelium. Our aim was to study the relationship between ATP and NO release in 1) early diabetic bladders, an overactive bladder model; and 2) in 'diuretic' bladders, an underactive bladder model. To induce diabetes mellitus female rats received 65mg/kg streptozocin (i.v.). To induce chronic diuresis rats were fed with 5% sucrose. At 28 days, in vivo open cystometry was performed. Bladder wash was collected to analyze the amount of ATP and NO released into the bladder lumen. For in vitro analysis of ATP and NO release, a Ussing chamber was utilized and hypoosmotic Krebs was perfused on the urothelial side of the chamber. ATP was analyzed with luminometry or HPLC-fluorometry while NO was measured with a Sievers NO-analyzer. In vivo ATP release was increased in diabetic bladders and unchanged in diuretic bladders. In vitro release from the urothelium followed the same pattern. NO release was unchanged both in vitro and in vivo in overactive bladders whereas it was enhanced in underactive bladders. We found that the ratio of ATP/NO, representing sensory transmission in the bladder, was high in overactive and low in underactive bladder dysfunction. In summary, ATP release has a positive correlation while NO release has a negative correlation with the bladder contraction frequency. The urinary ATP/NO ratio may be a clinically relevant biomarker to characterize the extent of bladder dysfunction.

PMID: 21145365 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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Effects of transobturator adjustable tape sling procedure on the therapeutic outcome in patients with stress urinary incontinence and detrusor underactivity.

Effects of transobturator adjustable tape sling procedure on the therapeutic outcome in patients with stress urinary incontinence and detrusor underactivity.: "


Effects of transobturator adjustable tape sling procedure on the therapeutic outcome in patients with stress urinary incontinence and detrusor underactivity.

Int Neurourol J. 2010 Apr;14(1):20-5

Authors: Jo DG, Yang SA, Seo JT

PURPOSE: To evaluate the outcome and efficacy of transobturator adjustable (TOA) tape sling operations on women with intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD) and/or detrusor underactivity (DU) combined with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective analysis comprised 60 TOA patients. 30 patients hadDU (Qmax < 15ml/s) and/or ISD (Valsalva leak point pressure;VLPP < 60cmH(2)0) on the preoperative UDS and the rest only had SUI. I-QoL, visual analog scale (VAS), Patient's Perception of Urgency Severity (PPUS), and Self-Assessment/Sandvik Questions were performed before and 1 year after surgery. The mesh tension was controlled at 1 day after surgery. The objective cure rate was defined as no leakage using the cough test with a full bladder. RESULTS: PATIENTS WERE DIVIDED INTO TWO GROUPS: Group A:SUI with ISD and/or DU, n=30; Group B:only SUI without ISD and DU, n=30. The two groups showed a difference in Qmax and VLPP preoperatively. Objective success rates were 18 (60.0%) completely cured, 10 (33.3%) improved in Group A, and 23 (76.7%) completely cured, 7 (23.3%) improved in Group B. Three cases needed tape-tension adjustment due to urinary leakage one-day after surgery (2 in Group A, 1 in Group B). There was no postoperative urinary retention. CONCLUSIONS: After TOA for SUI with ISD and/or DU, 3 cases were needed tension adjustment after surgery. TOA procedures seem to be effective and safe, more clinical studies with long-term follow up are required for a definite conclusion.

PMID: 21120172 [PubMed - in process]
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