April 22, 2011

Two screening tests for urinary voiding dysfunction used in 209 consecutive patients undergoing lumbar spine operations.

Two screening tests for urinary voiding dysfunction used in 209 consecutive patients undergoing lumbar spine operations.: "
Related Articles

Two screening tests for urinary voiding dysfunction used in 209 consecutive patients undergoing lumbar spine operations.

Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2010 Mar;44(2):106-12

Authors: Orlin JR, Klevmark B, Bjørnsen L, Hermansen P, Sanchez M

OBJECTIVE: A study of the prevalence of urinary voiding dysfunction was carried out preoperatively in 209 patients undergoing lumbar spine operations, using two non-invasive screening tests: free uroflowmetry and ultrasound measurement of residual urine. The value of using the two urodynamic screening tests in the evaluation of a larger group of patients with sciatica from disc lesions or spinal stenosis has not been published as an article before. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 209 consecutive patients, 159 with lumbar disc lesions and 50 with lumbar spinal stenosis, the main indications for operative treatment were pain and/or somatic paresis. In preoperative interviews, information about voiding, anal and sexual functions were obtained. Then uroflowmetry was performed and the volume of residual urine was measured. In this study, the definition of normal bladder function is based on normal flow rates, the shape of the curves, normal voided volumes and the absence of significant residual urine. Bladder dysfunction differs from normal function by one, two, three or all four of these parameters. RESULTS: Normal bladder function was found in 66 patients (31.6%). The other 143 (68.4%) had signs that could indicate sensory paresis and/or neurogenic detrusor underactivity. Seventy-nine of the 143 were also tested 3 months postoperatively. In 58% the bladder function had improved. CONCLUSIONS: The very high prevalence of abnormal uroflowmetry and/or postvoiding residual urine suggestive of possible bladder dysfunction (68.4%) indicates that the two tests should be used routinely in cases of lumbar disc lesions and spinal stenosis. The two tests provide documentation of preoperative voiding function and a possibility of comparison with postoperative findings.

PMID: 20095869 [PubMed - in process]
"

April 21, 2011

Lower urinary tract function in patients with pituitary adenoma compressing hypothalamus.

Lower urinary tract function in patients with pituitary adenoma compressing hypothalamus.: "
Related Articles

Lower urinary tract function in patients with pituitary adenoma compressing hypothalamus.

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2005 Mar;76(3):390-4

Authors: Yamamoto T, Sakakibara R, Uchiyama T, Liu Z, Ito T, Yamanishi T, Hattori T

BACKGROUND: The micturition reflex is under the tonic influence of suprapontine structures including the anteromedial frontal cortex, basal ganglia, and hypothalamus. However, there have been few reports about the role of the hypothalamus on the lower urinary tract (LUT) function in humans. OBJECTIVE: To investigate LUT function in patients with pituitary adenomas. METHODS: Urodynamic studies were carried out in three patients with LUT symptoms who had pituitary adenomas extending upwards to the hypothalamus. RESULTS: All three male patients (age 28 to 62 years) developed LUT symptoms (urinary urgency and frequency (3); urinary incontinence (3); voiding difficulty and retention (2)) along with weight loss, psychiatric symptoms, unsteady gait, and/or visual disturbances. One had the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, but none had diabetes insipidus. Two had resection of the tumour and subsequent radiation therapy, but LUT dysfunction persisted. The third patient had partial resection of the tumour to ameliorate hydrocephalus. Urodynamic studies showed detrusor overactivity during the storage phase in all patients; during the voiding phase there was underactive detrusor in two and non-relaxing sphincter in one. CONCLUSIONS: Hypothalamic lesions can cause severe LUT dysfunction in both the storage and voiding phases of micturition. This may reflect the crucial role of the hypothalamus in regulating micturition in humans.

PMID: 15716534 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
"

April 1, 2011

Sacral neuromodulation in patients with multiple sclerosis.

Sacral neuromodulation in patients with multiple sclerosis.: "


Sacral neuromodulation in patients with multiple sclerosis.

World J Urol. 2011 Mar 15;

Authors: Minardi D, Muzzonigro G

PURPOSE: We present a case series of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction treated by sacral neuromodulation (SNM). METHODS: We reviewed charts of 25 patients who were treated for refractory lower urinary tract symptoms; during the SNM testing phase, patient management included evaluation of number of daily voiding, number of episodes of incontinence, residual urine and quality of life score. Patients who experienced greater than 50% improvement in symptoms of frequency and incontinence episodes and/or a greater than 50% decrease in the number of catheterizations and a greater than 50% increase in voided volumes were offered placement of the permanent InterStim(TM) . RESULTS: Fifteen patients were implanted with InterStim(TM); mean duration of MS was 13.66 years; mean follow-up of patients was 49.4 months. Nine patients were on clean intermittent catheterization, and in all of them, a significant decrease in residual volume with increase in voided volume and number of voiding per day; in 6 patients, the main problem was incontinence, and in them incontinence, episodes decreased and voided volume increased. Sixty-six per cent of patients have a functioning device after a mean follow-up of 61.2 months. CONCLUSIONS: SNM is a good option in the treatment of voiding dysfunction in patients with MS in a medium to long-term follow-up. Urinary retention due to detrusor underactivity is not a good indication for SNM; it should be offered to MS patients with refractory urgency urinary incontinence and MS patients with urinary retention due to detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD).

PMID: 21400258 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
"