October 29, 2012

Lower urinary tract symptoms of neurological origin in urological practice.

Lower urinary tract symptoms of neurological origin in urological practice.:
Lower urinary tract symptoms of neurological origin in urological practice.
Clin Auton Res. 2012 Oct 26;
Authors: Magari T, Fukabori Y, Ogura H, Suzuki K
Abstract

PURPOSE: The present study aimed to reveal the neurological origin of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in routine urological examination. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 70 cases to identify cases in which the neurologist and/or urologist suspected the relation between neurological diseases and LUTS. The compromised neurological areas were categorized into brain and spinal cord based on the appearance time of LUTS and presence/absence of disease specificity. We classified the lesion site based on the imaging result and the neurologic finding. We compared LUTS appearance time: from LUTS appearance till the first visit to urologist (first visit urologist) and from the aforementioned visit till the neurological diagnosis confirmation (neurological diagnosis). Finally, we conducted a detailed investigation of the surgical cases, as well as those with urodynamic studies (UDS) performed prior to the neurological examination. RESULTS: The neurological diseases involved 31 cases (44 %) of multiple system atrophy, 11 (16 %) of multiple sclerosis, and 4 (6 %) of Parkinson's disease. Associated symptoms comprised gait disturbance (38) and lower limb dysesthesia (20), while no associated symptoms were observed in 13 (19 %). Both the periods proved significantly shorter for spinal cord disease. Urological surgeries were performed in 10 cases (14 %). UDS findings revealed 10 cases of decrease in bladder compliance, and 15 of detrusor underactivity; no normal cases were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Consideration of detailed medical history, enforcement of UDS, and closer cooperation between urologists and neurologists are required to ascertain early and correct diagnosis, and to avoid unnecessary surgery.


PMID: 23099558 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

October 18, 2012

Aging and recurrent urinary tract infections are associated with bladder dysfunction in type 2 diabetes.

Aging and recurrent urinary tract infections are associated with bladder dysfunction in type 2 diabetes.:
Related Articles
Aging and recurrent urinary tract infections are associated with bladder dysfunction in type 2 diabetes.
Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol. 2012 Sep;51(3):381-6
Authors: Lin TL, Chen GD, Chen YC, Huang CN, Ng SC
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to demonstrate the diversity of urodynamic findings and temporal effects on bladder dysfunction in diabetes as well as to evaluate the predisposing factors that attenuate the storage and voiding function of diabetic women.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this prospective study, 181 women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and lower urinary tract dysfunction underwent complete urogynecological evaluations and urodynamic studies. The patients' histories of DM and the treatment agents used were documented from chart records and interviews. The urodynamic diagnoses were recategorized into two groups for comparison, namely overactive detrusor (detrusor overactivity and/or increased bladder sensation as well as mixed incontinence) and voiding dysfunction (detrusor hyperactivity with insufficient contractility and detrusor underactivity with poor voiding efficiency) in order to evaluate the temporal effect of DM on diabetic bladder dysfunction.

RESULTS: The development of bladder dysfunction showed a trend involving time-dependent progression, beginning with storage problems (i.e. advancing from urodynamic stress incontinence to detrusor overactivity and/or increased bladder sensation) and eventually led to impaired voiding function. The duration of DM relative to the urodynamic diagnoses of these women was longer in women with voiding dysfunction (6.8 ± 2.8 years with urodynamic stress incontinence, 7.3 ± 6.5 years with detrusor overactivity and/or increased bladder sensation, and 10.4 ± 8.3 years with women with voiding dysfunction). Notwithstanding these findings, stepwise logistic regression analysis indicated that age and recurrent urinary tract infections were the two independent factors associated with developing voiding dysfunction.

CONCLUSION: The urodynamic study revealed a temporal effect on bladder function, and women with diabetic voiding dysfunction were found to have had a longer duration of DM than women with an overactive detrusor. However, aging and recurrent urinary tract infections are the two independent factors that contribute to impaired voiding function and diabetic bladder dysfunction.


PMID: 23040921 [PubMed - in process]